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Business

Sleepy Dan: Printing SnapBacks

by Sleepy Dan on November 6, 2011

Sleepy Dan snapback hats released this week! Screen printing on shirts has been so much fun so I am working to print on new apparel bodies too. This is the first part of the Fall line addition, the second half will release by the end of November. These hats are USA made and printed at Classic Cap & Embroidery with a high density ink to give the graphic some texture. There are several types of printing texture you can use, but all are able to be printed thru a normal silk screen. Using a dense ink for printing, means using a lower count screen mesh to let the ink easily pass thru the screen onto your material.

This is a 95 count mesh attached to a small metal frame, custom made for printing on headwear. The emulsified screen has the new wake up graphic burned into it the same way a larger screen is made for printing on t shirts.

The thin flat metal frame is bendable and slides into this form shape. The form gives the screen a stable arch that matches the shape of the hat crown, so an even transfer of ink goes onto a non-level surface.

After the frame is secured into the form, the screen is taped off just like a larger t shirt frame. This makes sure no ink will leak around the edges of the emulsified screen.

The form is secured into the specialty headwear manual printing press. This setup is used with specialty headwear dryer, which is taller to fit hats and has the heating coil on the side rather than on the top like a t shirt dryer. This makes sure the ink printed on front of the hat is properly cured.

Normal ink can be combined with several different types of textured materials, to create a different texture print. The amount of ink has to be precisely combined with the correct amount of high density material to create the desired look during printing.

The headwear printing press looks very similar to a t shirt press, but the pallets are curved just like the screen and hat crown. A hat is positioned on the pallet and secured with a spring mechanism at the back, then the press is operated like this — LIVE PRINTING

After printing, the hat takes a 15 second run thru the dryer which activates the high density material and cures the ink to the hat.

Each hat has to be positioned perfectly on the small pallet surface so all graphics are printed in the correct area of the front crown. This process is tested several times till the desired graphic position is perfected for the project. The hats I printed have a five panel crown, so there is one front panel of the hat.

I tested the printing on some Flex Fit six panel hats, but not all of the prints came out well because the seam at the front of the hat did not allow perfect printing every time. The printing surface has to be perfectly flat for printing success. As with all printing, some mistakes happen and then some mistakes are a surprise success… Screen printing is an art form, so have fun with it!

The Classic Cap & Embroidery sewing team is amazing, the side woven label is attached with precise placement every time like this — LIVE SEWING

I made some interior woven labels for extra detail. They are again attached with amazing placement like this — LIVE SEWING

I hope this insight helps you design a better project, knowing how easy it is to get it done. I made this hat printing a limited edition only printing 30 khaki and 30 navy hats. Creating something original is so much fun, so I’m looking forward to making some new snapbacks for Spring 2012…

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Daily Tee & News Roundup for November 2nd

by Andy on November 2, 2011

teefury mario dinosaur t-shirt

It took me reading the description to realise, but this TeeFury shirt is actually about Mario, not just a dinosaur wearing boots.


Well, that song is in your head now, thanks Qwertee.


Tilteed may not be releasing new designs at the moment but their back-catalgoue has a lot of really good shirts so I can handle it for a while.


Nice concept behind this Shirt.Woot design, and adorably style.


I don’t really understand why the Nyan cat became popular, but that’s usually the case with memes,but I do like this Doctor Who shirt at RIPT.


I haven’t seen Game of Thrones, but I can see how this crossover Star Wars shirt works very well at The Yetee.


Ahhh, one of those rare “Mexican folk art x He-Man” mashups at TeeMinus24


It’s 8-bit and I like it, good work 24tee.


I can’t help but feel there’s a reference that I’m missing in this shirt from Tee Raiders.


That area of empty space is still bothering me about this Loviu shirt.


Fair to say that this Catch of the Day Tee shirt is not for me.


A Better Tomorrow have still got loads of their shirts on sale for 19€


12 new shirts on sale at NoiseBot.


Poketo have released some fall items like ponchos, scarves and hats that look like bears.


I think that the infographic tells you everything you need to know about this CX.CITY sale.


Daily reading time store owners, enjoy 20+ Essential Resources for Improving Your SEO Skills!


Spend over $55 and get 20% off an free shipping ($8 off shipping for international folks) with the coupon code KNOWME at Karmaloop.

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Daily Tees & News Roundup for November 1st

by Andy on November 1, 2011

Zelda t-shirt

Zelda shirt from TeeFury today, nice style and colourway.


Another old design from Tilteed, they don’t seem to have released anything new for a while, I’ll drop them an e-mail to ask what is up.


It’s quite hard to tell from the image above, but the skull in this Stupidhurts.us shirt is made of kisses, thus the name ‘Long Kiss Goodnight.’


This tee from Shirt.Woot is surprisingly Anglo-centric, I didn’t know Americans knew the Guy Fawkes story.


Great Gremlins shirt from RIPT today.


OtherTees have a Portal gun sketch up for the next few days.


As someone who enjoys killing time with Angry Birds, I can appreciate this 24tee shirt.


Once again Barbie is a slut at Loviu.


I feel like the Mario image is a little bit awkward on this Catch of the Day Tee shirt, but I do still like the design overall, and I’m not sure how I’d prefer Mario to look, so it’s a bit of an unfair comment.


Japanese -inspired design from Shirt Punch. Man, I’d love to go back to Japan on another holiday.


Ugmonk have released a premium wooden ampersand (that holds itself to a stainless steel base with a super strong magnet) priced at $299 that makes me wish I knew how to use the very expensive CNC that we have in our workshop (for my other job). As someone who has been around wood for his entire life I feel that it is a bit pricey, but then I’m looking at it as a product rather than art, and with it being a limited first run of 15 pieces I can see how that has pushed up the price.


Neighborhood have released a new expensive t-shirt.


Today only you can get 20% off your order at Glamour Kills with the coupon code TRICKORTREAT.


New blogger on HYA Goodfibres have cut the price of their shirts to £15 until November 7th.


PalmerCash have 20 new shirts in stock, presumably these are two of them.


Storenvy are giving away two signed copies of the Thread’s Not Dead book. IATT have all the details, be sure to enter before November 4th.


Wrongwroks have had a big release in their webstore, not many tees so I didn’t think I should give them their own post.


And lastly, your daily reading for t-shirt store owners from Mashable, “How to Time Your Facebook Posts to Reach the Most Fans“.

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3 new Big Cartel Themes from Tonka Park

by Andy on October 31, 2011

big cartel themes



I’ve got a Tonka Park making the HYA store look pretty (well, pretty enough), and I like a lot of the work that Matt does for the Big Cartel community. He’s just dropped 3 new themes and as usual they’re delightfully clean (one is even designed with mobile devices in mind, reordering and resizing content to take account for your browser size). I’m sure that some of you may find $100 for a theme to be a bit steep, especially when Big Cartel is quite a cheap service, but when you consider how much you’ll be paying for tee designs and printing then $100 isn’t really that much to have a good-looking store set up in a couple of hours.

Tonka Park have also updated their Big Cartel WordPress plugin, and HYA is given a surprising mention in the announcement of it’s release. You can now embed a widget on you WordPress site showing a product list (organised in the same order as in your BC product admin area), and also use shortcodes to post items from anyone’s store in blog posts, that means I could embed shirts from Big Cartel stores straight into posts, which is pretty nifty.

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Daily Tee & News Roundup for October 31st

by Andy on October 31, 2011

free hugs t-shirt

Hmmm, something seems a little fishy about this offer of free hugs at TeeFury.


Qwertee are giving us a realistic version of Sonic the Hedgehog (with Tails and Knuckles too).


Nowhere Bad have a Blade Runner themed shirt available.


Great image from Shirt.Woot.


Huh, not often that you get one Sonic design in a week, but thanks to The Yetee this is our second of the day.


TeeMinus24 have a Zombieland-themed shirt referencing the different ‘rules’ that Jesse Eisenberg has for surviving a zombie apocalypse.


I’m fairly addicted to Reddit, so I like this shirt from 24tee.


Mario Boos design from TeeRaiders today.


GraphicLab themselves admit that this style of shirt has been done to death, but ‘hopefully evil’ is something I haven’t seen before.


Shirt Punch give us the most explicitly Halloween themed shirt of the day with ‘Monster Mash.’


RIPT have a cool Mario-inspired shirt today. Is he fighting the power? Is Mario the 99%?


Vaughn de Heart have got a new look website and to celebrate they’re offering 30% off from now until November 6th with the coupon code Forza.


Mashable have got 10 reasons why your website could be costing you sales. Some of these things are pretty obvious, but I think all store owenrs should give them a quick look to get them thinking about their site.


TSHIRT STORE released a slew of great new tees, I think I’d wear every single one, which can’t be a bad thing.


As someone who writes for a living a post called ‘SEO for Non-Dicks‘ got my attention, and whilst SEO bores me to tears, it is unfortunately something that we people of the internet need to know about to get ahead, and that includes t-shirt site owners.

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Daily Tee & News Roundup October 28th

by Andy on October 28, 2011

panda astronaut t-shirt

Very nice Panda/astronaut t-shirt from TeeFury today.


Another oldie-but-goodie from Greg Abbott at Tilteed today, it’s a really lovely design.


Weren’t you always a little disappointed when you had to play as Luigi? Stupidhurts.us


Hahaha, silly owl. Shirt.Woot


Nice tribute to A Clockwork Orange at RIPT today.


If a single one of you gets the reference on this TeeMinus24 design I will be amazed.


Fairly creepy looking Doctor Who design at OtherTees today.


24tee bring us a classic Halloween design.


I didn’t like this Donald Duck shirt when Loviu first released it, and on the second viewing my opinion has not changed.


I have no clue what is going on in this Catch of the Day Tee shirt.


Nice Doctor Who design from Shirt Punch, I think it’s fair to say those guys have had a pretty decent first week.


I stumbled upon this fantastic tutorial by Natalie Jost detailing several ways that you can customize your Big Cartel store to give it features which you would usually expect to see in a standalone ecommerce solution.


Sturban are offering free delivery in the UK on all orders until the end of the month.


BustedTees have put all their fall releases on sale for $14 a piece until noon (EST) on October 31st.


Dephect are offering 25% off all their tees with the coupon code HALLOWEEN11 until November 3rd.


I’ve never heard of Kii Arens before, but their shirts are on Fab.com now, $19.50 down from $35, and they’re looking mighty fine.


Digital Gravel have knocked 50% off everything, which is pretty huge, all you have to do is use the coupon code THX2011, the infographic says 3 days, but it’s now more like two and a half.


T-Post, the Swedish t-shirt subscription service, are going to stop using a wholesale blank (I’m fairly sure they were using American Apparel) and produce their own shirts, and they want feedback from you to help make it ‘the best t-shirt the world has ever seen.’


That above is a relaunch teaser for PPRHRT, I was unaware that they were in need of a relaunch but there you go, like their Facebook page to keep up to date with their relaunch progress.


A reminder that Urban Industry‘s big Halloween sale is ongoing.


PLNDR are giving away a $250 gift pack from Breezy Excursion, who I’ve never heard of so I presume that means they’re popular.

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threadbird discount

30 cents off per shirt may not sound like a huge amount, but who would turn down getting $30 off their next print run of 100 shirts at Threadbird?

Offer runs from now until the end of October, and no, you can’t place the order on November 1st and get the special offer “because your designer didn’t send over the file in time.” If you’re late, you’re late.

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don't start a clothing company

These two articles are a few weeks apart, but they tread a lot of the same ground so there’s not much point posting them separately. Ray from Lowdtown (who is in the process of relaunching the brand and is documenting the journey) has posted an article explaining just how much it costs to start a brand the proper way. People think that you can just put anything on a shirt, print 50 as cheaply as possible, open a Big Cartel store, and you’ll be the next Johnny Cupcakes. It doesn’t work that way and Ray tries to give you a bit of perspective, of course there a some people that do start out with one design and work their way up to being the next Bape, but they’re probably less than one in a million.

Jon Kruse over at How To Start A Clothing Company makes some good point in an article simply called “Don’t start a clothing company.” His site is dedicated to starting and running a clothing company, and he gets 25,000 unique visitors a month, which is 25,000 people either already making strides in the world of clothing or trying to start their own brand, and that’s 25,000 people every month. That’s a lot of people trying to get into a market that I felt was saturated when I started writing HYA almost 6 years ago, and it has grown exponentially since then.

Of course, these guys don’t really want you to not start your company, they just really want you to think about what you’re doing, consider all the angles, think not just about your first release but what happens after that. How are you going to market? Who are your potential customers? What is your price point and potential profit? How many shirts do you need to sell to fund your next release? Are you going to sell online, at craft fairs, open a pop-up shop, a permanent store, wholesale, a combination of these? Who will print your shirts? What printing method will they use? What blank shirts will you use? How much does shipping cost? How will you package your shirts? What happens if someone wants a refund? Who will design your shirts and branding? Who will design your website? There are literally hundreds more questions that you need to ask yourself, I just thought of those in a minute or two as a few examples. By all means, if you have a vision, go with it, but please be aware that t-shirts are not a path to riches for the vast majority.

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Sleepy Dan: Printing Bed Bugs

by Sleepy Dan on October 20, 2011

Great to see you back at the Behind the Design column! The purpose of the column this week is to give you a behind the scenes look at the complete process for printing a shirt. It can be complicated and not many designers know all the steps that go into printing their creations, but the Sleepy Dan column aims to help by sharing experience. I work as the Creative Director for a domestic manufacturing company in Dallas called Classic Cap & Embroidery. Several of my projects will be made here so you can see the production being made on the factory floor. Being a better designer means understanding the production process you intend to use, then creating and laying out your design in a way that makes it easiest for the production to be successful. If you are not well informed, there is a good chance the printing company will not share your vision for the design, or have to charge you more to set up the art correctly for them to print. In this column, I intend to share the point of view for every type of production that Sleepy Dan uses. This week we printed the Halloween design which is the first of the Monster Under the Bed series!

The Sleepy Dan series one was printed on TulTex shirts because they are based in Texas, but moving forward I will be using Next Level shirts which is a step up in quality. I prefer a better quality shirt than all the name brands out there, but price is the battlefront for a sale so I am sure there are several shirt qualities as good as this or better, like American Apparel. The type of shirt and color you intend to use should be well planned out. Quality and price of the shirts you use is an overlooked detail when screen printing because you are so focused on the printing, you can forget that if the shirt is not comfortable and fits well, you will have trouble selling it no matter how cool the art is. Get to know all the shirt companies out there and what other brands are using. Look at shirt brands like types of cars, because there are so many different qualities and colors, then salesmen you have to purchase them from… All printing companies allow you to purchase outside shirts to ship to them for printing, or will help purchase the shirts for your project. But you must understand that if you purchase your shirts thru anyone other than the manufacturer, they will be marked up a little bit for each wholesaler, so I always suggest you purchasing directly thru the manufacturer. Just gotta allow for ordering and shipping time.

The first step to printing your design is making the films. A film is basically a dense black print on top of a transparent vellum. It’s printed with registration marks for each color you intend to use in your shirt. There is a setup fee for every color you print, so if you want to print more colors the shirt will cost more. A good design will not use more than several colors so the project can be profitable. The setup fee includes printing the film and burning the film image into the screen that will be used to make the printed shirt. The film can be stored for future reprinting, but reprinting is a sign of an uncreative brand. Make new designs cause there is lots of competition out there…

The film is carefully measured out to for center placement on the emulsified screen, so all screens made can keep good registration and all colors line up perfectly during printing so there is no offset printing of the colors. The film is scotch taped to the emulsified screen to keep placement for the burning process inside the exposure unit.

The “burning” process is basically like creating a photo. The screen is first thinly coated in a light sensitive photo emulsion liquid, dried in a dark room so the emulsion is not exposed, then the film attached to the screen is put into this vacuum sealed exposure unit for the process that exposes the image into the emulsion. The screen is not harmed in this “burning” process, so the screen can be reclaimed after printing for hundreds of future printing projects.

After exposure, a pressure washer is used to spray out the unexposed emulsified screen area. It easily washes out because the UV light did not hit this area. The exposed emulsion is hard and the unexposed emulsion is still water soluble. The exposed area is well adhered for the printing process and will need special chemicals to be removed from the screen after the printing is complete. This type of wash out booth is necessary for all burning and reclaiming of screens, it always creates a huge mess…

After wash out the screens are checked for perfect image translation and need to dry out completely. Screen sizes needed for your printing project depend on the art you want to use, up charges for larger or jumbo screens are an industry standard, so try to keep your art to a maximum 13 inch width size. The screens are basically a metal or wood frame with a screen permanently stretched over it. Screens have a mesh count which describes the amount of threads in a square inch size. The lower the thread count, the wider the holes in the screen, which means lower image resolution and more ink being pushed thru the screen onto your shirt. The higher the thread count, the smaller the holes, which means higher image resolution and less ink being pushed thru the screen to your shirt. The low side of a mesh count will be 80, which is what is used on large letters making a thick print. The higher side of a mesh count will be 305, which is what is used on a very fine detail image making a thin print. Normally I prefer to use a 195.

A dry screen means it can be taped off and made ready for printing. The bottom side border of the frame needs to be taped off so there’s no bleeding around the emulsion edges. Registration marks are left un-taped till after the frame is set into the press and first printing on a shirt is checked for screen alignment of all colors. Then you’re ready for production!

Working with an automatic press means much quicker production. There were only 60 shirts for this project printed, so it took about an hour to finish up the printing. This is a 10 color automatic and when properly run can output thousands of shirts a day, depending on how many people are running the machine.

Printing any project means you have to be able to create any color requested, so Classic Cap & Embroidery has a huge color mixing department. When sending your art to print, it’s helpful for you to pick the Pantone color you want to see on your shirt. This will help insure the color they mix will match exactly to the color you want. If you don’t pick the Pantone color, there is a higher probability for mismatch.

Using an automatic press means all the prints will have a machine’s perfect consistency. The press allows for adjusting the pressure used by the squeegee on the screen, so you can put more or less ink thru the screen. Check out a short video of the Bed Bugs shirt printing at the Sleepy Dan YouTube page.

The shirt is lined up on the platen board, so the print is centered on the shirt. Then the shirt rotates around to the corresponding color and is printed in order from least detailed layer first, then most fine detail layer last and making it the top layer. Between each color a flash unit will heat the shirt to cure the printed color, before moving onto the next color, so the previous printed color does not adhere to the bottom of the next screen color and make a mess for upcoming shirts.

The final shirt print runs thru a large conveyer dryer that super heats the shirts to fully cure all colors printed. The dryer is hot enough to cook a steak, but the shirt is in the dryer for about six seconds which will not harm the cotton.

To print on the back side of the shirt is the same to print on the front, but one side has to be fully cured before moving onto the back print, so the shirts have to be run thru the dryer twice. The Monster Under the Bed series print at the back neck is a simple one color, so the cost is just like printing one more color at the front. But the added value of having a back  design to display the limited edition appeal of the shirt, makes it really special.

After printing is complete, the screens have to be reclaimed which can be a messy project. Excess ink is removed from the screens, then screens are washed in eco friendly trapping system so the ink is not just washed down the drain. Then the screens are dipped in chemicals, scrubbed, and power washed to remove all emulsion from the screen so it can be used for the next printing process.

Private labeling your shirt means bringing it to a seamstress so the factory label can be un-stitched, removed, then your label can be sewn back in. It sounds like a simple process but it should be professionally done so the shirt’s factory seam looks unharmed.

Classic Cap & Embroidery has a screen printing department, embroidery department, and huge factory floor for cut & sew. The employees are very skilled and love working on fun projects like this. Having a cut & sew department means they have all the machine types to create anything out of fabric like headwear, clothing, or accessories. Having their help means that sky is the limit! So you will be seeing them create some great projects for Sleepy Dan.

Taking the shirts home to my printing lair, I am able to custom number all the shirts, so the Bed Bugs design is individually numbered 1-60. If you get one, your shirt is one of a kind and will not be reprinted! Check out the Sleepy Dan shop to see more images of the Monster Under the Bed series one.

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ript artist appreciation

I can’t help but feel that the “but wait, there’s more” should be the top dog in that infographic instead of the Amazon gift cards, but it’s up to RIPT how they promote this big competition. I can see a lot of artists being interested in this competition, the artists will always own the designs, so it’s worth submitting on the off chance that you get picked (and you’ll get he usual $1 per shirt sale anyway), and you might be $1,000 better off when Christmas rolls around.

RIPT Artist Appreciation

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Sleepy Dan: Behind the Design

by Sleepy Dan on October 12, 2011

Hopefully after you read this posting, you will find yourself checking out the Sleepy Dan link below. I was asked by the Hide Your Arms team to create a column from the perspective of an up-and-coming indie clothing brand. My expectation of this column is to share the behind the scenes of a designer creating seasonal lines of clothing and apparel. Working in the Dallas area as a graphic and apparel designer, I’ve gained great experience as a branding designer since graduating from Ringling College of Art & Design – Yes, I went to clown school… But no, Sleepy Dan is not clowning around!


Recently the Sleepy Dan signature line was released and already finding many fans that share common bonds with a lack of sleep. Being close to the beginning, I want to share the production journey from the start and help anyone looking for some guidance on their search for a successful project. Success of your project can be broken down into two parts. Making a product that is popular and able to sell for profit, then having fun with the project so you can consistently repeat the process while adding your creativity. I don’t believe success is measured in financial wealth, rather happiness of life while pursuing what you love. So stay sleepy, there is no time to rest because if “You Snooze, You Lose!”


Starting out means you have minimal money to invest in the project and tons of time to perfect the first line. Around two years ago I decided to learn how to screen print from home so I could cut my overhead. I purchased some screen printing supplies and hardware from craigslist.org, aselart.com and gogsg.com then researched how to complete the process. After a couple months of working out the process, I was able to successfully print 40 shirts in a night, then hand out to new fans at events like Kixpo and Sneaker Summit.


The purpose was to get some recognition and feedback for the branding direction with only the cost of the shirt, the ink, and my time invested. Taking your time to perfect everything from the trademarking to the clothing and the social media is most important. This is not a race… Get out to local clothing events and make friends with everyone in your city. Knowing the market you are looking to enter is just as important as making product for it. Make sure you understand the quality of product everyone else uses, so you are not considered out of bounds… Invest in a bunch of indie brand shirts you think are cool and represent some other brands. They will be your best allies down the road! You gotta give props to the city you love…


The finesse of screen printing is just as much an art form as the designs you are printing. Starting from making films, then burning the film image into the emulsified screen for printing, then working the squeegee over the ink filled screen, the process is not complete until a high temperature is used to bind the ink to the apparel threads. Using water based inks is less harmful at home, especially during cleanup. Sorry I can’t share pics of our spare bathroom tub, cleanup has turned it into a scene straight out of Scarface…


Becoming a recognized brand means being thorough and original with all the smallest details. Coming up with new ways to market your brand is your last step after you have a product ready to distribute. Have fun with the process from start to finish and you will be the wealthiest person you know! Creating more complex designs means you will need help from a local printer, or embroider, or seamstress. They are not difficult to find and work with, but it helps to be confident and understand the process they work with. The Sleepy Dan column will be sharing more of the apparel and accessories production from the line with you along the way, so stay posted! Contact me if you have any questions about your process, help is universal so don’t overlook it.

Thanks to Andrew for letting me become part of the Hide Your Arms team and one of the new featured columns!

http://www.sleepydan.com/

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t-shirt sketchbook



This is a pretty cool idea, I know that in practical terms you could just draw the shape of a tee in a regular sketchbook and just draw inside the lines, but this is a really fun way of constraining yourself to the shape and it might actually even be a useful tool for t-shirt designers that don’t do everything on their computer with a tablet. Each book contains 170 pages of 150gsm paper, and whilst at $15 there are cheaper notebooks out there, this one certainly is unique.

Costiness=$15 Buy it at Pukka/Dank

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How to prepare your t-shirt design for printing

by Andy on September 28, 2011

how to prepare artwork for printers

Blake from YouDesignIt (who guest posts here from time to time) has written a guest post over at Design Juices explaining to people that are new to the t-shirt game how to go about preparing your file for the printers, which is something that may not be immediately obvious to everyone. It’s by no means an exhaustive guide, but it definitely sets you along your way.

3 Helpful Tips to Get Your T-Shirt Design Print Ready

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Post image for 5 Tips to improve your product photos and help you sell more t-shirts

One thing that hasn’t change in 5+ years here at HYA is me complaining about people having terrible product photos. There’s no excuse for it these days, you don’t need a DSLR and a studio to take a few decent shots of your items, a little knowledge and a point-and-shoot is enough to showcase your wares to their best ability.

Mashable have put together a post giving 5 simple but easy to follow tips for improving your product shots. There are definitely better tutorials out there, but I’d say that this article is worth a minute or two of your time.

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