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How to make a DIY t-shirt folding board

by Andy on February 28, 2013



I have one of those fancy plastic t-shirt folding boards (that’s right, fancy plastic) and find it really useful for getting my tees all the same shape and size so I can stack them on my dresser (when you have as many as I do storage become an issue), but you can quickly and easily make one yourself that will do the same job using some sturdy cardboard and duct tape, and probably last a while too.

Shirt Folding Board from Cardboard and Duct Tape

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how to get a band sponsor

If you’re in a band and you’re playing to crowds, then your chest can be seen as an advertising space, especially with the way teenagers view people in bands as borderline-deities that they want to emulate. Thus, bands want to get sponsored, they want to wear free t-shirts, and they want to give brands ‘exposure’. I received this e-mail recently (names and places altered to save them embarrassment):

My name is Cornelius, I’m the frontman for the band The Arm Hiders based out of Unknownville. We are in search of a company to work with to sponsor us on our upcoming tour this Summer. We came across your company on line and have check out your site and feel like we would love to rep your company on tour this summer. If you all endorse bands, we would love to help you all out and get your name out there on the road. Feel free to email us back if you would like to work out something with us. Thanks for your time, and we look forward to hearing back from you. Cheers.

That was it, that was the whole thing. Let’s leave aside for a second the fact that I don’t even really have a line (the HYA store doesn’t really count, does it?), because I wanted to look at what was wrong with that e-mail and how it would be a poor way to approach a clothing brand (or any other company) if you were looking to get yourself, your brand, or possibly your sports team sponsored.

1. The sender doesn’t say hello, or address me by name, a clear sign that it’s a copy pasted e-mail and that they are contacting several people with the same message. Take a second to find out someone’s name and you’ll be a lot more likely to receive a response.

2. There’s no link to the band’s website or music. I’ve never heard of The Arms Hiders (what a silly name!), but maybe if I heard their music I’d really like it and think it was worth sending them some t-shirts. The lack of a website also suggests that this band may be quite small and not yet have any web presence. Bands need to make it as easy as possible for a t-shirt company to hear the music, if that takes more than one click then it’s going to really reduce the response rate.

3. Your band is going on a tour this Summer, so what? Tell me when and where you will be (maybe I can meet you at one of your shows), how big the venues will be, if you are the headline act, what merchandise you sell, if you will be performing at any festivals, how Twitter followers and Facebook likes you have, if your tour will be advertised and if so, do the sponsors get exposure from that. Clearly, the e-mail sender recognises that there is value in terms of exposure for the t-shirt brand, but there’s not enough info to back that up. What the sender needs to do is give a t-shirt brand reason to stop and think if there is enough value for their brand to give the band free t-shirts to wear on the tour.

4. “If you all endorse bands” ignoring the strange wording, this is again another sign that the sender has sent a copy/paste e-mail, and also proves that they haven’t taken the time to look at your site properly. T-shirt brands that do sponsor bands will often like to showcase the bands in some way on their website. Sponsoring a band can be a mark of pride for a t-shirt company, it’s a good way for them to associate themselves with a style of music and also a lifestyle, which quickly gives potential customers and fans something to identify with. So bands should take a good look at each brand and make sure your music fits with their style, and if they do sponsor bands then you already know that it’s something they might be interested in with your band.

5. Copy/paste e-mails are the devil. It is easier to send a copy/paste e-mail, but it’s also easier for someone to delete one, they’re impersonal and almost always sound like adverts. If you want to get a reply from someone you talk to them like a person, create a connection and give them some respect, especially if you’re hoping for them to give you hundreds of dollars of clothing in return. It’s okay to have a general template of an e-mail, some bits of blurb will always be the same, but edit and personalise each e-mail to maximise the chance of getting a response from each brand. Oh, and t-shirt brands talk, so if you e-mail lots of similar brands, they’ll probably know about it.

6. Make sure your spelling and grammar are perfect, or at least the best you can do. There are a few errors in the e-mail I have shown above, and there are parts which aren’t just typos too, which suggests that it was rushed and not re-read to check for errors. If this e-mail is a bands first point of contact with a t-shirt company, what kind of impression does that give? Not a good one in my opinion. If English isn’t your strong point then get someone to write your general template for you and then you can add in the personal stuff that you’re comfortable with on a case-by-case basis, no one is expecting you to be Shakespeare, but brands want to know they’re dealing with professionals. If you are trying to contact someone in a non-native language, make that clear too.

7. If the t-shirt company responds, so do you, quick. Replying to e-mails quickly shows that a band is serious about the sponsorship opportunity, this isn’t a flirty text message with that girl from last night, you don’t need to wait 3 hours to respond. Think about what the t-shirt company wants, a band that will wear you stuff on stage when photos are being taken and tell people about the t-shirt brand, replying quickly to a response is the first step in proving that you’re conscientious and trustworthy. I sent a response to the person that sent me the e-mail above, two days later I haven’t heard from them and I doubt I ever will, potentially I could have been a fan of their brand and suggested them to t-shirt brands for sponsorship, as it stand they’ve lost both those opportunities by not replying to an e-mail.

If you have any suggestions or feedback please leave me a message in the comments, or on Twitter @hideyourarms. In a few weeks I will take a look at whether there really is value for brands sponsoring bands and if the exposure bands provide can help with getting a t-shirt company more fans and customers.

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T-shirt news for February 15th

by Andy on February 15, 2012

doctor who t-shirt

Y’know, it’s been weird not writing about Doctor Who t-shirts every day, TeeFury have brought me right back into it with this great tee though.


Shirt.Woot have a rather interesting Zelda shirt.


Sons of Anarchy x He-Man at RIPT today.


Okay gang, time to play the “tell Andy what this shirt is referencing” game since I have no idea.


Nowhere Bad have a shirt for all those rage moments you get whilst gaming.


I can’t really take too much heat with my meals, but for those of you that do 24tee have a shirt that may be right up your alley.


I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Community’s paintball episode was one of the finest half hours of my life, thanks for the reminder TeeRaiders.


Mathiole gets some love with this colourful shirt at DBH today.


This shirt is $11 instead of $20 in BustedTees daily deal (which has 2 days to run… aka not daily).


Deadmau5 wore a t-shirt with Skrillex’s phone number on it to the Grammy’s, that little rascal.


RIPT have a great video (6:31 long) explaining every step in the process of creating one of their shirts, it’s a great walkthrough and worth a few minutes of your time. I didn’t realise that RIPT did their printing in-house, I’d always presumed that the daily sites outsourced their printing work.


Cottonable noticed that Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz is running a design comepetition with MASScanvas.


IAMTHETREND have a great review of Capitl Clothing.


krudmart are holding an end of Winter sale.

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Watch Derek Deal’s Design Process

by Andy on August 1, 2011


This video is the best part of a year old now, but I’m sure that it will still be of interest to people looking to see how an accomplished designer like Derek Deal gets his work done. If you’d like some words to go with the video, and a bit of a walkthrough written by Derek, check out this post on How To Start A Clothing Company.

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How to Make T-shirt Bracelets

by Andy on July 27, 2011

how to make t-shirt bracelets

I’ve covered similar ground to this before in my post “How to customise & recycle your old t-shirts“, but people are tweaking methods all the time and coming up with new ideas. Also, that photo looks lovely.

Insstructables: How to make t-shirt bracelets.

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big cartel SEO

One of the compromises of using a hosted storefront like Big Cartel or Storenvy is that even though you do get some degrees of control, you’ll not be able to configure every aspect of the system the way that you would like. For a lot of people this is okay, they just want a simple storefront that they can use to sell their tees, but it does of course have a few drawbacks.

I am quite sure that Big Cartel are well set up for search engine optimisation within their system, but there are a few things you can do to further help yourself and hopefully move up the rankings in Google searches, hopefully getting you more sales in the process.

Tonka Park is a small Big Cartel Theme shop (the HYA shop actually uses one of their themes) has put together a short guide with four things that you can do to your store quite quickly and quite easily that should help your SEO almost immediately.

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how to make vintage t-shirts

My buddies over at Found Item clothing have put together a really interesting series of posts showing you how to speed up the aging process and give your brand new shirt a more vintage look. The posts haven’t all gone live yet (they will be by the end of the week), but there’s already some really good information there including step by step tutorials showing you show to age a t-shirt using different processes. They’ve clearly put a lot of work in so it’s worth taking a look, and the results of some of the processes look really good.

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t-shirt brand startup guide

If you’re well into launching your fifth season of t-shirts this guide probably isn’t for you, but if you’re just thinking about getting your toes wet in the exciting world of t-shirt commerce then I would very much recommend checking it out. To someone like me who has been reading guides like this for years there aren’t really many shocking revelations, but it is a really well-written guide that covers all the bases and gets you pointed in the right direction and gives you plenty ideas about things that you will need to research further. In fact, I think that the most important thing anyone can do before committing to starting a brand is doing more research than they think they need, because when it comes to tees there is no such thing as too much research, whilst getting out there and just doing it can teach you a lot, by the same token you can save yourself a lot of time and money by hitting the internet hard first and making sure you know exactly what you want.

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iamthetrend clothing line advice

Adam over at IAMTHRETREND (who has just been killing it lately, very impressive work) has done quite a few interviews with some heavy-hitters of the indie world overthe past few years, and he’s put together an article that quotes some choice pieces of advice for people running clothing lines or thinking about starting a clothing line.

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How Artists Should Approach a Company

by Andy on March 19, 2011

how to approach a company as an artist

Andy over at ReThink Clothing (we refer to each other as ‘other Andy’, but I think we all know he’s the other Andy) has written a good article on his blog on the subject of how artists should approach companies that they’d like to work with. He deals with college artists every day, as they’re the people who create the t-shirts in the ReThink store, and he’s been selling tees since 2007, so he has probably gained a decent insight into what works and what doesn’t when it comes to being approached by artists. Check out Andy’s article “How artists should approach a company!“.

Yeah, sure the picture appears to have nothing to do with the post, but…. no it doesn’t, I just didn’t want to leave this without a picture on it.

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How to prepare artwork for screenprinting

by Andy on January 8, 2011

How to prepare artwork for screenprinting

Smashing Magazine seems to absolutely nail it every time they do a tutorial, and whilst I’m no expert on the screenprinting process, they seem to have done it again with an excellent tutorial about how to prepare your images for printing in Adobe Illustrator.

Preparing Artwork for Screen Printing in Adobe Illustrator – Smashing Magazine

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Coty’s 365 days of t-shirts

by Andy on January 7, 2011

coty 365 t-shirts

The Hawaiian t-shirt posting tornado, Coty Gonzales, has set himself an almighty task for 2011, “365 days of t-shirts.” I’m sure you’re rolling your eyes, “but Andy, ya handsome devil, loads of people have worn a different t-shirt every day for a year, what makes Coty so special, and by the way, I like you new jumper.” Thanks imaginary person, it IS a nice jumper, but let’s focus here, Coty isn’t wearing a different t-shirt every day in 2011, he’s providing craft projects, tutorials, and other cool t-shirt related things every day for the whole year (though I think he may have already failed as he’s only holiday at the moment, hopefully he’ll be able to catch up). With the project he is hoping that at the end of the year he might be able to produce a book, wouldn’t that be cool!

Day 1 was the t-shirt journal you can see above that was inspired by Moleskine notebooks, day two was an Experimental Jetset parody wallpaper, on the third & fourth day Coty turned a t-shirt into a throw pillow (it was reposted exactly the same on day 3), and on the fifth he discussed categorizing on the blog.

Clearly, he’s not quite keeping up with the 365 element, but there is some cool stuff, and you can follow it all with the Project365 tag.

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How to fold a t-shirt (boobies edition)

by Andy on October 22, 2010

Very informative. If for some reason you prefer your t-shirt folding demonstrations to be in Japanese, check out the original video of this technique (that I know of) at howtofoldashirt.net

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cotton in motion

HYA is meant to be fun, and not just because I’m a bit of a man-baby that is afraid of growing up, but because if I were to get into the nitty-gritty of t-shirt world I’d probably get really bitter and hate the world and this blog would be a sad place indeed. However, one person who seems to be able to handle that is Brad, the serial blogrepreneur that has setup Cotton In Motion (a play on Research In Motion?), a blog that aims to help t-shirt brands market themselves.

As far as I’m aware, Brad hasn’t had experienced marketing his own t-shirts, which I would assume a lot of people would see as a negative, and I’d tend to agree because it’s one thing to talk the talk, but if you’ve got nothing to show for it then why should I bother listening to you? Well, Brad also runs a t-shirt blog, and that does give him an awful lot of experience in terms of being marketed at by brands, so taking my own experiences, I’m sure he has had some of the same terrible approaches that I have had. Brad will guide you through how to approach bloggers (my tip, candy and a van with no windows), and how to market your t-shirts in other ways. If you’re starting out, or thinking of starting a t-shirt line it’s already a good resource and it’s only just launched.

I would quite like to see the site looking a bit more lively though and representative of the industry, it feels a bit too ‘businessy’ at the moment, which is strange because the writing is very accessible but the format looks a bit vanilla, hopefully it will develop a bit more personality and character as the site grows.

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How To Create A Balanced T-shirt Graphic

One of the artists that I always like to see work from is J3concepts, so it’s good to see him spreading the wealth with this tutorial about how to create a balanced t-shirt graphic on Computer Arts. I’m not sure how much help it will be to seasoned designers, but some of you might find it useful.

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jimiyo graffiti

I can’t design, I’ve accepted this, I know what I like, I can put text over a picture, but doing something from scratch is just something I will never master (so why bother, eh?). However, Jimiyo is a good illustrator and knows the tee world well, so when he’s dropping pearls of wisdom, you should be trying to catch them. Check out his tutorials on how to win online design contests (hint: you’ve got to be in it to win it), and how to make money selling your art (and yes, t-shirts play a part in that too).

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Interview with Eric Terry of Linty Fresh

by Andy on March 29, 2010

linty fresh interview

You guys know me, so you know I love t-shirts, travel, and food. So in this interview you can expect me to ask Eric Terry, the man behind Linty Fresh, about his clothing company, what life is like in China now that he has lived there for almost a year (with a bit of a break in the middle), and what weird stuff he’s eaten. I don’t really feel like Eric or his company need an introduction since they’re such a regular feature on HYA, putting out lots of great designs, and being something of an inspiration for the tee community, so we might as well get straight into it.
[click to continue…]

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jake nickell of threadless

In case you thought that Threadless was only good for stalking people and performing menial labour tasks and calling it fun (I’m talking about FarmVille), I spotted this cool note from Jake Nickell, one of the founders of t-shirt powerhouse Threadless, showing an e-mail exhange he had with some asking him about the early days of Threadless. Here’s part of the e-mail sent to him:

I’m mostly just amazed that you were able to start a company for $1000.

My future partner and I seem to be spinning our wheels, continually changing our business model and general idea for what we want to create. I think this is due to the fact that taking the step from concept to reality has so many hurdles we don’t know where to start. What was the first step you and your partner made to make Threadless a reality? If you could do it over, what would you do differently?

How long after coming up with the idea for the company did it take for the first shirt to be sold?

How would you have done things differently if you had $20,000 instead of $1000 to start up Threadless? Was money a real limiting factor?

I’m sure you haven’t made TOO many mistakes, but what was the first big mistake you made while creating Threadless?

Thank you again, and I totally understand if you don’t have the time to answer any/all of the above questions!

Random Question: I know you got the first $1000 for Threadless by winning a T-shirt design competition, but have you ever had any of your designs printed by Threadless?

And here is his response:

Yo! Good questions. My answers all revolve around the fact that Threadless started as a hobby not a business. The company was started 1 hour after the idea was born. It started as a thread on a web forum. We simply asked people to post tee designs, we’d pick some good ones and make them – and sell them… Giving the designer a few free tees for themselves.

As a designer and member of the art forum, this was just a fun project/thing to do for the community. $20k would have been way too much to spend on a pet project like that. It’s kind of like saying would you have been better at becoming a good skateboarder if you had $20k to buy your first board and build some ramps rather than $500. I’d never want to spend that much on an unknown hobby.

When we posted that thread nothing operationally existed at all. We had no t-shirt printer lined up, had no idea how we would sell the tees, no business entity. This is when we put the $1,000 together. (which was actually out of pocket – I didn’t win anything but my design bein printed in that first competition) I used $200 of it to talk to an accountant about setting up a sole proprietorship. I was 100% owner under this structure for the first 3 years before we became a corporation and I gave some ownership to my partner. Who, btw, was another member of that forum that I talked to a lot. Just great to have someone else excited about the project to bounce ideas off of.

The first contest on that thread was in november ‘00 – we had the winning tees up for sale on a crappy website by February ‘01 and that is when we made our first sale. For the couple years that followed, we had a separate bank account collecting revenue, using 100% of it to just print more tees. We didn’t take a salary at all.

There is absolutely nothing I would change. Honestly.

I know that quite a lot of you will already be aware of the backstory to Threadless, but it’s still good to hear it from another angle and in such a candid way.

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HYA Tours the Spreadshirt HQ in Leipzig

by Andy on June 30, 2009

spreadshirt-leipzig-exterior

Whilst I was in Berlin for T-Shirt Day it seemed like a great idea to hop on the ICE train (which isn’t as cool as it sounds) and head 100 miles south of the capital to the city of Leipzig to check out Spreadshirt’s much-larger-than-I-expected HQ and production facility. If any of you are wondering, “who the devil are these Spreadshirt folks?” Well, they’re the largest (I think) print-on-demand supplier in Europe, and they also have offices and production in America, meaning that whichever side of the Atlantic you’re on you can get a high-quality customised tee pretty darn quick. I actually have a tee from 2004 that I bought from Spreadshirt (yeah, I was all about the tees even before I started HYA!) that’s still going strong, so they really do know how to make tees, and presumably they’re even better quality now.

Upon getting off the train in Leipzig’s beautiful station I was met by Adam from Tee Junction who was going to act as my tour guide to the city, and I don’t think he’d actually had a tour of the new Spreadshirt facility as he had left the company before they moved in, so the day wasn’t a waste for him, hopefully. I always say that the best way to get a feel for a city is to walk through it, you don’t see much when you take public transport (especially if it’s underground, obviously), so we walked from the station to Spreadshirt through the lovely old centre of the city and the huge park to the more industrial side of the city. One strange thing about Leipzig is that there are a lot of abandoned buildings in the city because of vast numbers of people (around 500,000 people in a city of 1 million) leaving the city after the collapse of the wall and re-unification of Germany, many of those people never returned, meaning that there is lots of unoccupied space. Even just across the road from Spreadshirt’s freshly-renovated building there was a really nice building that had clearly received no love for many years and sat empty. According to Adam this situation means that rents in the city a very low not only for housing but for business as well, so people will set up businesses as a hobby that are only open for a few days a month, it’s a strange concept to me, but I like it.

As you can see from the picture at the top of the post, it’s pretty easy to spot the Spreadshirt building because it’s covered in everyone’s favourite item of clothing. Apparently you don’t need to give taxi drivers the address to Spreadshirt because they all know about “the building with the t-shirts on it.” It’s pretty hard to miss as well, seeing as it takes up a whole block.

spreadshirt-leipzig-roof-deck

Eike (seen here on the right at T-Shirt Day Berlin) decided we should start our tour on the top roof deck of the building, giving us a good view over the city. The weather hasn’t treated them too well so far this year so the roof decks haven’t seen much use, but they hope to use them for events when it starts to heat up. I might be wrong in remembering this, but I’m pretty sure that the roof deck spaces (there’s more than one) if combined would actually be larger than their old offices, which shows how much of a step up the move was for them.

spreadshirt-leipzig-kitchen

We then moved down to a meeting room/kitchen/break room, passing a couple of guys playing table tennis on the way, from the looks of the league on the wall next to the table these guys get pretty serious about the table tennis competitions. Can you believe that the kitchen above is in a t-shirt companies offices? It looks like it should be in a showroom!

spreadshirt-leipzig-foosball

What self-respecting internet company could have offices and not have a foosball table?

spreadshirt-leipzig-meeting-room

This meeting space shows how light and airy the building is, I think that they might have more room than they know what to do with!

spreadshirt-leipzig-batman

This picture obviously doesn’t illustrate it particularly well, but in one of the receptions they have a life-size model of Batman, Eike didn’t seem to really know why it was there, but I’m sure that it’s an important addition to every office.

spreadshirt-leipzig-adam-fatboy

I remember Adam being pretty excited about the addition of Fatboy chairs/bean bags to the office, and wondered why they weren’t there back in his day.

spreadshirt-leipzig-hanging-tshirts

In one of the larger offices, because the ceilings are so high they were having problems with noise and echoes, the innovative solution to this problem was right under their nose, t-shirts! They hung a load of t-shirts up and now they help to stop the noise bouncing around the room.

spreadshirt-leipzig-wall-tees

These pieces of wall art are made of t-shirts they printed in the factory and stretched around frames, which I thought was a really cool idea. Some of you may recognise the broken up image as one of the finalists for the Open Logo Competition that Spreadshirt held to find their new logo.

spreadshirt-leipzig-returns-room

This is the returns room. You’re probably quite alarmed by the amount of items in there, but I couldn’t actually see anything technically wrong with the couple of items I picked up. I get the feeling that a lot of people just return items when they receive them because the message that they thought would be funny on a tee really isn’t, or they made an error when picking the fonts and colourway. I get that feeling because most of the returns I picked up were really badly designed.

spreadshirt-leipzig-returns-boyfriend

This returned tee that Adam found made me a bit sad, because why would return a tee that says “I [heart] my boyfriend” when there’s nothing wrong with the tee. A lot of the returned tees get given away to charity, and staff are regularly allowed to rummage around and take them too, so presumably most of the people at Spreadshirt have really weird t-shirt collections.

spreadshirt-leipzig-corridor

Along this corridor only about half of the office spaces were occupied because they still haven’t worked out what to do with the rooms, I think some of the ideas thrown around included a studio for recording video (there was already a photo studio along the corridor) and maybe even a room just for playing Wii in. It must be cool having all this space that they have to think up cool stuff to do with rather than having cool ideas with nowhere to implement them.

spreadshirt-leipzig-glow-in-the-dark-room

A lot of the offices and rooms in the building have been given names, sometimes the names have a purpose, and sometimes they make no sense at all. I was disappointed to hear that this room doesn’t glow in the dark…

spreadshirt-leipzig-production-floor

And here she is, the production floor. As you can see, it is a large space, filled with lots of Germans working in a stereotypically efficient and hard-working manner.

spreadshirt-leipzig-t-shirts

I think that these guys might have even more tees than I do!

spreadshirt-leipzig-plot-printer

This machine is one of about six (I can’t remember how many) that print/cut the designs on the various vinyls and foils that Spreadshirt offer, each machine has been given a name (this one is called ‘John’), presumably just to cut down on confusion between machines rather than just being cute.

spreadshirt-leipzig-print-cutters

These are the people that remove the ‘scrap’ vinyl from each sheet leaving just the bits of vinyl that are to be pressed onto the shirt. The rate at which they worked was really impressive, I’m sure if I were to do it there would be an awful lot of prints being thrown into the rejects bin.

spreadshirt-leipzig-quality-control

These people check over every item before it leaves the factory to ensure it meets quality control standards.

spreadshirt-leipzig-dtg-machine

Whilst it isn’t a large part of their business, Spreadshirt do have a DTG (direct-to-garment) printing machine, and it was really cool to see it in action as I’ve never witness it before. It’s basically a really big inkjet printer, which you think actually makes the process less interesting since I’d presume most of you are reading this post with a printer a couple of feet away from you, but it was fascinating watching a design appear on a t-shirt with each pass of the print head. The printed t-shirt then goes through a large dryer (to the left, out of shot), which I think can best be described as a jumbo-sized version of one of those toasters that you only ever see in hotels where you put your bread on to a conveyor belt and the toast comes out the other end.

spreadshirt-leipzig-test-lab

As we were leaving the production facility Eike pointed out the test lab where they put every item in the store through it’s paces. The rather bedraggled tee you can see above is the cheapest t-shirt they sell, and it has been put through 100 wash and dry cycles, so it’s hardly a surprise that it’s not looking too good, though the print seems to have held up fairly well.

leipzig-icecream

I’ve missed out on some of the office space, partially because I don’t like taking pictures of random people (even though Eike told me it was okay) and partly because a lot of the pictures I took came out pretty poorly, so if you were thinking that it didn’t seem as big as I was describing it, there’s quite a lot more offices, and a lot more people, than you can see in the photos. After the tour Adam and I caught a tram back into the centre of the city (unfortunately it wasn’t one of the Cold War era relics that I’d seen rolling around, but trams are always fun) and went for ice cream…

leipzig-beer

… and beer. You know how when you go into a restaurant in America you automatically get given water? They have the same kind of thing in Germany except you get beer. Okay, that isn’t strictly true, but it sure does feel like it. We were later joined by Evan Eggers (who, if you remember, I’d met the day before at T-Shirt Day) for another beer before I headed back to Berlin on the train. Good times!

leipzgi-ice-train

Thanks to Adam and Eike for guiding me around the city and the Spreadshirt HQ (aka ‘T-Shirt Geek Disneyland’)!

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Stop mocking me!

by Andy on January 22, 2009

14udt-2432e446594fca7e44ca50922a71636b497618ff

See that t-shirt up there, that is not a t-shirt, that, apparently (and I am skeptical) is a mock up. It was made up (I think) by Jeff Finley from Go Media (you’re probably more aware of their blog if you’re the kind of person that designs rather than hires designers), and I’d really like to see a tutorial about it because if this is a relatively simple process then I’d love to see it being used by more designers.

You’ve probably gotten bored of the amount I complain about poor mock ups and photoshoots of the tees and hoodies I feature, and partly I bitch because I want to have good looking images on my website, but I also mention it so frequently because on the internet we can only judge clothes by the way they look on the screen (though I’d like to think that my reviews help to give a more accurate impression of the companies that send me tees), and if your mock up doesn’t look good, you aren’t representing your own hard work well, and you aren’t giving t-shirt buyers a reason to buy your t-shirts, and I find that really frustrating.

Hoo, I feel better after that little rant, now get out there and fix your damn mock ups.

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