Posts tagged as:

science

“Made of Stars” by Ban T-shirts

by Andy on May 15, 2011

made of stars t-shirt

I don’t particularly care for this design, but I like the idea behind it:

The elements essential for life – such as oxygen, calcium, carbon and sulfur – were formed by nuclear reactions in the stars. They were flung far out into the universe where they cooled and became the material that formed the planets, and eventually, evolved into life. We are, literally, Made of Stars.

I remember back when I was a young teen in physics class we had a mad professor type teacher who clearly loved his subject and he told of us about how people were ‘made of stars’ and at the time it was a very strange concept to bend your head around, but at that age quite a lot of things are hard to understand, like why the whole world is against you (what? You didn’t think that as a teen?).

Costiness=$20 Buy it at Ban T-shirts

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50% off science t-shirts at Double Helix!

by Andy on November 15, 2010

double helix coupon code

I found out about Double Helix via Hot Girls Wearing T-shirts (which I only read for the articles, promise), and noticed that on their front page they’ve got a coupon code for Black Friday that is already, and will give you 50% off your order, neato!

As it’s likely that you haven’t heard of Double Helix before, they’re a company that sell tees inspired by science, and I can see their designs being liked in a few science departments around the world, even if I think that they may need to go a bit nerdier to really capture the imagination of their niche. The coupon code is DHC50 and expires on November 29th.

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“Edison vs. Tesla” t-shirt by Witzkrieg

by Andy on August 17, 2010

edison vs tesla t-shirt

I really like the idea that back in the day there were guys like Edison and Tesla who were clearly a bit crazy (didn’t Edison try to blow up an elephant?) but were really pushing the boundaries when it came to science. I guess it was pretty easy to push the boundaries of science in the olden days since they didn’t have as much stuff, we take lightbulbs for granted now, but I imagine someone flicking a switch and turning on a lightbulb blowing minds when it first happened.

This version of the tee has a graphic on the back that says “Tesla wins”, but there is also a version that declares Edison as the victor if you enjoy being incorrect.

Costiness=$18 Buy it at Witzkrieg

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Science t-shirt by Adrenaline Clothing

by Andy on July 6, 2010

science t-shirt by adrenaline clothing

This tee costs $8, seriously, how can they produce and sell that and make any profit? I guess it doesn’t really matter to the end consumer, because you’re getting a cool looking tee for a low, low price, so go nuts!

Costiness=$8 Buy it at Adrenaline Clothing

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Parasite hoodie by Agar Apparel

by Andy on May 13, 2010

agar apparel hoodie

Under a microscope parasites are gross, never mind the fact that they make you sick. But, if you just look at the bigger picture, you probably won’t even know they’re there. The Agar parasite shirt is cool from a distance and pretty damn cool up close.

You can’t really see it in the main photo I’ve posted up there (peep the gallery for a close-up), but this hoodie is actually a lot better than it first appears, because the letters are made up of lots of little microbes and parasites… thus the quote above from Agar Apparel.

Costiness=$35 Buy it at Agar Apparel
[click to continue…]

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Science T-shirt by Vintage Vantage

by Andy on February 23, 2010

science t-shirt

I really like the simplicity of this design, and the stark use of ‘science’ with nothing esle to contextualise it does raise a smile. Unfortunately the tee is only available in size XL in green and size small in black, though looking at the sales of the HYA tee, most of you guys are those sizes anyway.

Costiness=$19.50 Buy it at Vintage Vantage

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qw-cheatsheet

I tried reading Dinosaur Comics for a while but just couldn’t get into it, maybe if I’d stuck with it for longer I’d have started to appreciate it more.

However (caution, a beast of a segue is coming up), one thing I can appreciate right now is this t-shirt (yeah, I told you it was good), which apparently a lot of other people do because it’s being reprinted in several sizes. It’s kind of hard to make out the writing on the tee, even on the larger picture on the product page, but what I could make out seemed pretty funny. One unfortunate thing I’ve found about tees like this is that people will insist upon reading the whole thing, which would probably get quite awkward after a paragraph or two.

Costiness=$18 Buy it from TopatoCo

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Thank God for Science! by umm… Science!

by Andy on February 27, 2009

thankgodforscience

I love this little saying, it always gets a chuckle out of me.

Costiness=$17.49 Buy it at WearScience!

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Periodic Table of Texting by Loyal Army

by Andy on January 22, 2009

5t-175-41

Personally, I utterly abhor the use of ‘text language’ when I’m writing a text on my phone, and I hate it even more when people use it in regular writing like a blog post, and I’ll probably give you a slap around the face if you spoke in text language.*

However, I do find this tee kinda funny, although I was surprised to find that it was produced by Loyal Army as it doesn’t really fit with their usual aesthetic.

Costiness=$19.50 Buy it at Loyal Army (or at Fred Flare for $24)

*For any occasion in which I’ve used text speak on HYA, it has been ironic, so, y’know, do as I say, not as I do.

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amorphianewyearsale

Like a lot of people, Jeremy, the guy behind all those brands mentioned above, has decided that one of the best way to kick off the new year is with a coupon code. All you have to do is use the coupon code NEW19 at the checkout and the discount will be applied, providing you had $20 worth of goods in your basket.

Amorphia Apparel
Science!
Teach the Controversy

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20% off at Amorphia Apparel for Halloween

by Andy on October 9, 2008


Yep, even more Halloween related goodness is coming our way. Amorphia Apparel are offering you 20% off your order, as long as you place your order before the end of the month, and as long as the order is for more than $30. Simplement!

The sale applies to the whole Amorphia range, which includes Amorphia Apparel (duh!), Wear Science!, and Teach the Controversy. To get the discount, just use the coupon code FALL28 at the checkout.

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4 tees on sale at Progresswear

by Andy on September 18, 2008


If any of the four tees in the picture above tickle your fancy, I’m sure you’ll be happy to hear than those tees have been put on clearance, with each design having its price cut to $12.99. A portion of the proceeds from every sale on Progresswear does lead to a donation to a ‘progressive cause’, so when you buy a tee you can pat yourself on the back for being such a helpful person!

Progresswear

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Amorphia’s Oktoberfest sale… in September?

by Andy on September 2, 2008


I was about to write a post about how it was stupid for Amorphia to hold their Oktoberfest sale in September (it would have been hilarious, trust me), but then a little alarm bell went off in my head, which was swiftly followed by the thought “Andy, you’d probably better google this otherwise you’re going to end up looking like an idiot… again.”

So I checked it out, and whaddyaknow, Oktoberfest is held in September! And the reason why is almost interesting (except I’ve found more than one explanation)!

The sale is in the form of a coupon code, OKTOBERSALE08, which will get you 15% off your order (as long as its above $25) at Amorphia Apparel, Science!, and Teach the Controversy.

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Apparently its already time for the back to school sales to begin; it almost seems as if these sales start as soon as kids break up for the summer holidays, or perhaps the summer break just starts earlier in the US than in the UK and that’s confusing me.

To get 25% off your order at Amorphia Apparel, Science!, or Teach the Controversy all you have to do is order two or more shirts enter the coupon code SCHOOL308 at the checkout to have the discount applied. I would love to see kids going to school wearing Teach the Controversy shirts, it would be hi-larious.

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banner.gif

Jeremy from Amorphia dropped me a line to let us know about their latest sale:

Just wanted to get the word out that we are running a 25% off summer sale across the whole amorphia family from June 16th to the 30th. All one has to do is purchase 2+ items and use coupon code SUMMER108, easy as pie eh?

So, that’s not just Amorphia Apparel, but also Science! (and its many robot-based tees), and the newly launched Teach the Controversy, which deals with all kinds of conspiracy theory based designs.

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Flickr Finds: Confusing shirt from CERN

by Andy on May 15, 2008

Confusing t-shirt from CERN

I don’t understand any of the physics on this tee since I’ve haven’t been taught about this stuff for more than 5 years and I don’t think we got to stuff that was this complex anyway, but I do think it looks pretty cool, and I like the idea that CERN would produce a t-shirt that such a small percentage of the population would understand. Fortunately for the person that was given this t-shirt as a present, it came with a leaflet that helps the wearer understand what the equations mean.

This equation neatly sums up our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces. It represents mathematically what we call the standard model of particle physics. The top line describes the forces: electricity, magnetism and the strong and weak nuclear forces. The second line describes how these forces act on the fundamental particles of matter, namely the quarks and leptons. The third line describes how these particles obtain their masses from the Higgs boson, and the fourth line enables the Higgs boson to do the job. Many experiments at CERN and other laboratories have verified the top two lines in detail. One of the primary objectives of the LHC is to see whether the Higgs boson exists and behaves as predicted by the last two lines.

Let’s just hope that the large hadron collider doesn’t destroy the universe so that we can all continue wearing t-shirts. I can’t find anywhere online that sells the tee, but if you’re really desperate then a visit to France or Switzerland may well be in order to go to the CERN Shop, I say France or Switzerland since the big ring of CERN straddles the border of those two countries and it isn’t clear which side the shop is on.

Photo Credit: Confusing T-Shirt from CERN by Quisnovus (usual disclaimer: the photo is ‘all rights reserved’, so it may well disappear in the near future if the uploader doesn’t like me using their photo)

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Nano-bristle T-shirt from.. ummm… Science!

by Andy on February 16, 2008

Okay, here’s a diversion from my usual coverage, a t-shirt that can actually generate electricity! From the New Scientist:

In 2007 Zhong Lin Wang, a materials scientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, US, developed a generator composed of a forest of piezoelectric zinc oxide nanowires topped by a flat conductive plate. As the plate is pushed down, the wires bend, producing a voltage that induces current to flow into the plate.

Now Wang has turned this idea into an electricity-generating thread, which he plans to weave into a fabric. His team figured out how to grow the nanowires on a strand of Kevlar fibre instead of a flat surface, so that the wires stick out from the fibre like the bristles on a pipe-cleaner.

When two of the bristly fibres rub against one another, the nanowires deform, causing a current to flow through a thin layer of metal coating on one of the fibres.

(That’s quite a long quote, so I feel like a bit of a plagiariser, but there’s no way I’d be able to explain this succinctly)

How awesome would it be if you could charge your cellphone just by wearing a t-shirt? Or keep your iPhone playing as long as you kept walking? I’d imagine that we’re probably many years away from this being a usable technology, but it’s always interesting to see how technology is moving on.

New Scientist

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